Timaru restaurant promotes “puppuccinos” accepting dogs for a cause

Nash is eagerly awaiting his puppuccino at the Timaru Cactus Fire restaurant.

Valentina Bellomo / Stuff

Nash is eagerly awaiting his puppuccino at the Timaru Cactus Fire restaurant.

The offer of a restaurant that accepts dogs excited Timaru’s dogs and their humans.

Cactus Fire on the Bay Hill designed a dog treat in the form of $ 4 puppuccinos, with part of the cost going to the Pound Paws charity.

Just a few days after putting on a Publish on social media announcing the new menu item, it had been shared 41 times and received 232 comments.

Puppuccinos consist of whipped cream topped with a sprinkle of crushed dog biscuit and an entire dog biscuit filling.

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Pound Paws Rescue is based in Oamaru, but covers further afield, having relocated dogs from Nelson to Winton.

Pound Paws founder Charmaine McLaren said the move was a nice surprise she found when the restaurant tagged the charity in its social media post.

McLaren said the organization was operating at full capacity, with 19 dogs currently in its care, including a hand-raised four-week-old puppy and a pregnant hunter left chained on a farm.

Cactus Fire co-owner Sarah Heurea is a dog lover who hopes to make dogs and their owners more welcoming while raising money for the Pound Paws charity.

Valentina Bellomo / Stuff

Cactus Fire co-owner Sarah Heurea is a dog lover who hopes to make dogs and their owners more welcoming while raising money for the Pound Paws charity.

The organization is run by volunteers and relies on fundraising and donations to survive.

McLaren said people were incredibly generous, raising money for expensive operations such as $ 600 to pay for the amputation of a working dog that was going to be slaughtered, and $ 3,000 to pay for pancarpal arthritis surgery for a dog who was donated online but found to have a debilitating ligament tear to a wrist joint.

She only has one dog, a greyhound-bull cross called Davey, whom she bred and then adopted after being found tied up and abandoned in a hog-hunting area at Mount Misery.

She said he was only skin and bones, had infected puncture wounds and old scars, and was very scared.

McLaren said the most rewarding part of running the association is finding amazing homes for the dogs and receiving photos from new owners.

“Someone’s unwanted animal has become someone’s treasure.”

Nash, an eight-year-old Jack Russell Nash enjoys a puppuccino at the Timaru Cactus Fire restaurant.

Valentina Bellomo / Stuff

Nash, an eight-year-old Jack Russell Nash enjoys a puppuccino at the Timaru Cactus Fire restaurant.

“My biggest frustration is that it’s 2021 and people still aren’t de-exercising their dogs,” McLaren said.

“I hear from people who need help every day and we are doing our best to find solutions.”

The organization also has a Give a small page.

Cactus Fire co-owner Kristy Phillip’s two boxer puppies and Sarah Heurea’s one-year-old German Shepherd all served as enthusiastic taste testers.

The couple said it’s important to create dog-friendly spaces, which are great for dog owners, but also help build a sense of community for all of their customers.

Phillips said customers who bring their dogs to restaurants should follow all usual etiquette of having their dogs on a leash and under control.

Nash relishing the delicate aroma of Coupland's Animal Feed dog biscuits on his puppuccino.

Valentina Bellomo / Stuff

Nash relishing the delicate aroma of Coupland’s Animal Feed dog biscuits on his puppuccino.

She said that as a small business they are often asked to support different causes. So she decided to make sure that the whole team chose one that she would commit to on an ongoing basis.

Phillips said she and the other co-owners – all dog lovers – wanted to find ways to make a tangible contribution to Pound Paws and planned to keep the puppuccinos going for as long as they were popular while looking for other ways to to collect funds.

Heurea said she knew Pound Paws met them on social media as she sought to adopt a playmate for Zeno.

“One of our regulars has performed two Pound Paws rescues and they are incredibly excited to support the initiative,” said Phillips.

Your next coffee date could be with your dog.  For $ 4, Rover can eat a puppuccino while supporting less fortunate dogs.

Valentina Bellomo / Stuff

Your next coffee date could be with your dog. For $ 4, Rover can dine on a puppuccino while supporting less fortunate dogs.

Customer Tracey O’Driscoll had seen the restaurant’s post and had come to pick up a take-out puppuccino for her loyal companion River, a rescue dog who was found abandoned in Temuka River.

She thought it was a great concept and can’t wait to have a puppuccino for River after their regular walks to the beach.

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