Aggressive coyote attacks people, wreaks havoc in Toronto park

The city is warning of an aggressive coyote roaming free in Toronto’s Bayview Village Park, with two park visitors bitten by the canid threat this weekend.

The incident took place in the park near Bayview and Sheppard on Sunday afternoon, the latest in a series of reports of coyotes wandering the park, apparently with little fear of humans.

Media say no one was injured in the attacks, but Toronto police report the animal is aggressive, adding that the public should avoid this park until Toronto Animal Services successfully captures the rogue coyote.

Some in the area say there is more than one coyote roaming the park at night.

One commentator claims these weekend attacks are no coincidence, with locals allegedly providing food to coyotes in that same park.

Others seem less worried, offering easy (and not at all recommended) self-defense measures to keep these four-legged attackers at bay.

Worried about a dangerous coyote on the loose, some challenged the cops’ choice of the word “citizens” in a tweet informing the public of the threat.

In a statement released on Sunday, the city responded to the information, saying “the city of Toronto is aware that two people were bitten by a coyote in Bayview Village Park earlier today.”

“Toronto Animal Services and the Toronto Police Services Emergency Task Force have been in the area all day today, working diligently to capture the coyote and will resume their efforts tomorrow,” the statement said.

“The coyote is still at large and the City advises area residents to stay away from the park and exercise caution in surrounding areas. “

“Coyotes are generally harmless to people and a bite to a human is abnormal behavior. To report a coyote sighting, call 416-338-PAWS (7297), or email [email protected] or complete an online form, “advises the city.

The city has a page where you can learn more about urban coyotes, their behavior, and the best way to stay safe around animals.



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Jennifer R. Strohm